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Bernhard Hube

Field of expertise:
Molecular mycology and fungal infection biology

Current position:
Professor and Chair for Microbial Pathogenicity at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Germany and Head of the Department of Microbial Pathogenicity Mechanisms at the Hans Knoell Institute, Jena, Germany

Speaker bio:
Bernhard Hube earned his PhD in Microbiology at the University of Goettingen (1991) and spent his postdoctoral time at the University of Aberdeen (1992 – 1995) and the University of Hamburg (1995 – 2000). In 2000 he became Research Group leader and Head of Division “Mycology”, at the Robert Koch Institute, Berlin. In 2006 he was appointed Professor and Chair for Microbial Pathogenicity at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, and in 2007 Head of the Department of Microbial Pathogenicity Mechanisms at the Hans Knoell Institute in Jena, Germany. He has co-authored > 200 publications dealing the molecular and infection biology of human pathogenic fungi, in particular Candida species. His recent research focuses on the first peptide toxin discovered in human pathogenic fungi.

Title of their presentation:
From commensalism to pathogenicity: interactions of Candida albicans with the host

About the presentation:
The fungus Candida albicans is both, a commensal and an opportunistic pathogen of man. The adaptation of this fungus to the human host is the result of an ancient, mostly commensal, relationship and has led to the development of distinct fungal strategies to survive and proliferate in diverse host niches. On the other hand, the host has adapted and evolved general and specific mechanisms to prevent invasion and infection by any type of microbes, including C. albicans. This co-evolution scenario has not only led to the emergence of distinct microbial virulence factors, which facilitate establishment in the host and pathogenicity, but also to “avirulence factors” (well known in the plant pathology field) or “immune modulators” (in the field of human immunology), which, once expressed, trigger microbial clearance by host immune responses.

Read more about Bernhard Hube here.